MA in International Development Course Descriptions


IntlDev 610: Foundations of Biblical Faith
Course Description
The purpose of this course is to provide a chronological overview of the historical and cultural aspects of the global development of the biblical faith. An overview is given of the past and present with focus on understanding factors that enabled the biblical faith to continue to expand its ideal of "shalom" and implement transformational strategies in developing nations. The positive and negative impact of religion on culture and human development is examined as well as principles for effective cross-cultural communication of biblical faith and practice.

Upon completion of the course, the student should be able to:

  1. Understand the purposes of God throughout history
  2. Articulate biblical and missiological perspective
  3. Evaluate the progress of biblical faith in different times and cultures 4. Reflect critically on your own culture and worldview

IntlDev 611: International Development in the Contemporary World (IntlDev 508B: INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT IN THE CONTEMPORARY WORLD)
Course Description:

This is the second of four courses that leads the student to analyze contemporary trends in history, resistance to the gospel, and the advance of the Kingdom, in all parts of the world. International development and its relationship to “missions” will be explored from the perspective of international authors and practitioners.

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. State a personal understanding of the concept of international development.
  2. Assess Kingdom Mission and its relationship to international development.
  3. Prioritize development needs of a society within which they serve.
  4. Analyze the relationship between culture, worldview and the spread of biblical faith.
  5. Articulate key development principles which can be put into practice within a specific society.

IntlDev 612: Global Transformation (IntlDev 508C: GLOBAL TRANSFORMATION)
Course Description:

This is the third of four courses that leads the student to analyze contemporary trends in a globalized world. Five major spheres of society are examined with application to a specific society in which the student currently works.

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Apply the study of the purposes of God in history and the development in societies throughout history to working cross-culturally in today’s globalized world.
  2. Propose development strategies that identify roots of societal problems and attempt to solve those problems.
  3. Use methods of hermeneutics to apply the message of the Bible to contemporary issues in concrete contexts.
  4. Evaluate what constitutes good political and organizational governance with special emphasis on biblical paradigms of leadership
  5. Express a perspective on the importance of developing/preserving the arts within a culture.

IntlDev 629: Capstone Project (Course 16: CAPSTONE PROJECT)
Course Description:

This is the last MA course. Students develop a major project that integrates historical, biblical, and cultural principles to identify the root of a specific problem within a specific society and to propose solutions to that problem. Guidance is given by the instructor in selecting the topic, choosing and applying appropriate research methodologies, and in developing the final presentation.

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. 1. Integrate multiple disciplines for the purpose of solving human problems.
  2. 2. Analyze the roots of problems within a specific society that need to be addressed from a biblical perspective.
  3. Articulate the implications of the meta-narrative of God’s constant work to extend his blessing and heal the world in a practical, concrete way for a specific ministry and/or NGO context.

IntlDev 630: Origins (Intl Dev 505A: EXPLORING ORIGINS)
Course Description

This is the first of four courses exploring God’s activity in history during the Old Testament era, with a chronological and interdisciplinary approach. The origins of matter, life, and civilization will be studied in this course, in the context of God’s central plan and promises for the world. Discovering the roots of human problems and seeking solutions requires an understanding of these origins. This course demonstrates the goal of international development: God’s will on earth, as it was originally intended.

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Articulate an understanding of different Christian approaches to creation, and views concerning the origin of evil.
  2. Integrate knowledge of ancient civilizations and religions with knowledge of the “Old Testament” Scriptures.
  3. Interpret the story of Genesis, in its historical and theological contexts, including the purpose of God for all peoples.
  4. Apply the skills of paragraph grouping and observation in Inductive Bible Study

IntlDev 631: Old Testament (IntlDev 505B: EXPLORING THE OLD TESTAMENT)
Course Description

This is the second of four courses exploring God’s activity in history during the Old Testament era, with a chronological and interdisciplinary approach. This course has a strong emphasis on introductory biblical studies, including exegesis, hermeneutics and word studies. The “Promise 22 Plan” of the Old Testament guides discussions about the Law, Atonement, Wisdom Literature and the Prophets. Comparisons will be made to views of the spirit world and afterlife in other cultures during this time period.

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Explain how the ethical formation of the Israelites relates to contemporary attempts to articulate biblical ethics.
  2. Compare two or more cultures’ views of the spirit world.
  3. Identify the genres of Wisdom Literature and Prophesy, describe their purposes, and explain their relationship to the overall Promise Plan of the Old Testament.
  4. Evaluate the relationship between a culture’s commitment to the principles of the Word of God and its level of development.
  5. Develop skills in biblical exegesis, especially interaction with secondary sources.

IntlDev 632: Religious Traditions of the Ancient World (IntlDev 505C: EXPLORING RELIGIOUS TRADITIONS OF THE ANCIENT WORLD)
Course Description

This is the third of four courses exploring God’s activity in history during the Old Testament era from a global perspective, with a chronological and interdisciplinary approach. This course has a strong emphasis on world religious traditions within the big picture of God’s activity and purposes in history. Inductive Bible Studies are a featured component of each lesson.

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Outline major developments in civilizations around the world during the time before 500 BCE.
  2. Articulate an understanding of the overarching questions that the cultural traditions of Hinduism and Buddhism are answering.
  3. Articulate an understanding of basic principles in contextual theology.
  4. Evaluate the usefulness of a knowledge of world religions for cross-cultural communication of the gospel and for international development.
  5. Write an annotated bibliography for an academic research project.

IntlDev 633: Theology and Culture (IntlDev 505D: EXPLORING THEOLOGY AND CULTURE)
Course Description


This is the last of four courses exploring God’s activity in history during the Old Testament era from a global perspective, with a chronological and interdisciplinary approach. This course has a strong emphasis on theology and the culture of the ancient Mediterranean world within the big picture of God’s activity and purposes in history.

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe Jeremiah’s and Ezekiel’s distinctive contributions to “promise theology.”
  2. Distinguish the characteristics of the Kingdom of God from the kingdoms of the world.
  3. Speculate on the problems in cross-cultural communication that arise due to ignorance of local cultural practices and their deep-seated origins.
  4. Explain the value of understanding the Mediterranean world for gaining insights into the biblical world and Scripture.
  5. Write a research paper with the use of appropriate secondary sources.

IntlDev 634: New Testament World (IntlDev 506A: EXAMINING THE NEW TESTAMENT WORLD )
Course Description

This is the first of four courses exploring God’s activity in history during the New Testament era from the perspective of God’s purposes in the world, with a chronological and interdisciplinary approach. This course focuses on the Intertestamental period, cultural background of the New Testament, an overview of the New Testament writings, the Kingdom teachings of Jesus, and the implications for international development.

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Compare the contemporary Western and ancient Mediterranean worldviews.
  2. Choose and defend a personal position regarding the value of the New Testament for understanding the nature of international development.
  3. Dialog with a secular audience about the nature of the gospel of the Kingdom.
  4. Defend a personal position on the role of believers in the expansion of the Kingdom.
  5. Draw applicable conclusions regarding missiology from Matthew and Luke.

IntlDev 635: The Life and Teachings of Jesus (IntlDev506B: EXAMINING “WORLD RELIGIONS” AND THE LIFE OF JESUS)
Course Description:

This is the second of four courses exploring God’s activity in history during the New Testament era from a global perspective with a chronological and interdisciplinary approach. Jesus’ mission, His death, resurrection and the Great Commission, as well as teachings on salvation and the hereafter in other religions will be studied in this course. Bible studies will be a component of each lesson.

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Apply knowledge of the social background of the New Testament to an understanding of Jesus’ exorcisms and healings.
  2. Justify a personal choice of how to best describe the doctrine of atonement based on your understanding of Scripture.
  3. Compare the views held by followers of the main world religions with those of the Bible, pointing out the similarities and differences in religions’ approaches to knowing God.
  4. Propose ways to approach followers of the world religions with the gospel, starting with what degree of truth they already have resident within their culture and belief system.
  5. Assess the concept of redemptive analogy

IntlDev 636: The Apostolic Era (IntlDev 506C: EXAMINING THE APOSTOLIC ERA)
Course Description

This is the third of four courses exploring God’s activity in history during the New Testament era from a missionary perspective, with a chronological and interdisciplinary approach. This course has a strong emphasis on the Apostolic Era and mission in the early church. Inductive Bible Studies are a featured component of each lesson.

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Discuss the “two structures” found in the primitive church.
  2. Explain the significance of the concept of “the excluded middle” for intercultural religious communication.
  3. Analyze principles of contextualization in the book of Acts and Paul’s epistles.
  4. Defend a personal position on the “end times” and articulate the importance of that position for missionary work.
  5. Apply appropriate hermeneutical methods and tools to the study of biblical texts.

IntlDev 637: The Early Church and the World (IntlDev 506D: EXAMINING THE EARLY CHURCH AND THE WORLD)
Course Descriptio
n
This is the last of four courses exploring God’s activity in history during the New Testament era from a missionary perspective, with a chronological and interdisciplinary approach. This course focuses on the growth of the early church and the spread of Christianity in the first 400 years, as well as the developments in cultures and societies around the world during this period. Inductive Bible Studies are a featured component of each lesson.

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Evaluate key factors in the spread of Christianity in the first 400 years.
  2. Consider the heresies, opposition and persecution faced by early Christians.
  3. Associate the cultures of the first century Mediterranean world (the world of the Bible) with cultural practices in other parts of the world.
  4. Compare factors the world religions have in common, such as purpose, practice, role in society.
  5. Discuss the distinctives of the Persian Church and how it differed from Christianity in the west.

IntlDev 638: Early Expansion of the Gospel (IntlDev 507A: DISCOVERING THE EARLY EXPANSION OF THE GOSPEL)
Course Description

This is the first of four courses that leads the student to discover the expansion of the gospel throughout church history and around the world with a chronological and interdisciplinary approach. The influence of the Gospel throughout the Mediterranean area and Europe up until 1200 CE will be studied. Comparisons will be made with the simultaneous growth of the Islamic movement. Reasons will be sought for the advances and retreats of the civilizations associated with each of these major world religions within the context of God’s purposes in history. Inductive Bible studies will be a component of each lesson.

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Analyze the consequences of the serious cultural differences between Christians during this time, especially as related to the later spread of Islam.
  2. Distill principles from the Celtic experience that could apply to modern nations in need of development.
  3. Discuss the significance of the “Carolingian Renaissance” in relation to world history and the progress of biblical faith.
  4. Defend a position on why the West was able to become the dominant force in the world.
  5. Explore contextualization as it relates to Islam.

IntlDev 639: Developments in World Religions (IntlDev 507B: DISCOVERING DEVELOPMENTS IN WORLD RELIGIONS)
Course Description:

This is the second of four courses that leads the student to discover the expansion of the gospel throughout church history and around the world with a chronological and interdisciplinary approach. The influence of the gospel on culture and cultural and religious factors that have had long-lasting effects on societal development will be studied. Comparisons will be made between patterns of religious changed in different parts of the world, in the context of God’s purposes in history. Inductive Bible studies will be a component of each lesson.

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Identify factors that influenced either the spread or curtailment of Christianity in this time period.
  2. Describe the role social tensions play in the development of a people’s religious self-identity.
  3. Discover the influence of religious values on social and political structures.
  4. Compare the effectiveness of methods used by several religions to seek the deeper spiritual life.
  5. Describe similarities and differences in the early introduction of Islam and Christianity into West African societies.

IntlDev 640: Europe’s Influence on the Rest of the World (IntlDev 507C: DISCOVERING EUROPE’S INFLUENCE ON THE REST OF THE WORLD)
Course Description

This is the third of four courses that leads the student to discover the expansion of the gospel throughout church history and around the world with a chronological and interdisciplinary approach. Europe’s impact on the world will be assessed in the areas of scientific, social, political, and religious developments. Continuing results from the successes and failures this time period will be discussed in the context of God’s purposes in history. Inductive Bible studies will be a component of each lesson.

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Examine the positive and negative effects of the Crusades and black plague on the development of western and world civilization.
  2. Evaluate the influence of the English Reformation on scientific, social, political, and religious developments.
  3. Assess the social and cultural impact of missions in African societies during this period, and possible implications for today
  4. Examine the political decentralization and theological diversity stimulated by the Enlightenment.
  5. Analyze the impact of the Evangelical Awakening on subsequent events, political and religious.

IntlDev 641: The Global Advance and Retreat of the Gospel (IntlDev 507D: DISCOVERING THE GLOBAL ADVANCE AND RETREAT OF THE GOSPEL)
Course Description

This is the fourth of four courses that leads the student to discover the expansion of the gospel throughout church history and around the world with a chronological and interdisciplinary approach. Relationships between spiritual awakening and societal development will be studied, including relationships between mission movements and colonialism. The impact of two major world wars on global civilization, the problem of evil, and the advance of the gospel will be examined within the context of God’s purposes in history. Inductive Bible studies will be a component of each lesson.

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Relate the idea of progress to social, political, economic, intellectual, moral, and religious movements prominent in Western society in this period.
  2. Propose a list of benefits and problems of colonialism during this period.
  3. Compare and contrast developments in the Christian movement in Africa and Asia during this period.
  4. Discover the factors that had an impact on the mission churches around the world due to nationalistic movements and the two World Wars.
  5. Explore the correlation between spiritual awakenings to developments in the world of missions.

IntlDev 642: Analyzing Global Trends (IntlDev 508A: ANALYZING GLOBAL TRENDS)
Course Description

This course leads the student to analyze contemporary trends in history, resistance to the gospel, and the advance of the Kingdom, in all parts of the world. The positive and negative results of the end of the colonial era and two major world wars will be analyzed, including both global evils and the 26 expansion of new missions. The new phenomenon of globalization and the implications for the Christian faith will be examined. Bible studies are a component of each lesson.

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Reflect critically on the changes taking place in global development as related to the growth of world Christianity.
  2. Analyze the negative effects of globalization in terms of poverty and inequality.
  3. Discuss differing approaches appropriate for voluntary organizations in working with the rural and urban poor.
  4. Appreciate the role of women around the world as vital participants in sustainable development.
  5. Suggest possible actions that can be taken in the quest for greater social and economic justice, including enhancing grassroots participation in development efforts.